Archive for the ‘Funny’ category

This Norton antivirus ad really cracked me up

August 3, 2011

I was immediately drawn to the sad guy eating a ketchup sandwich. Yuck, I thought. Why is he eating a ketchup sandwich? So I read the copy on the left.

Isn’t that hilarious, creative and effective? The message that a virus could ruin you financially is really communicated. If there hadn’t been a funny pic, I wouldn’t have read the copy in the first place. So go Norton for creating this great ad! By the way, it was in Wired magazine.

Kate Hudson and Victoria Beckham gave birth to…

July 11, 2011

…“brand new babies,” according to Boston.com. Thank god the babies were brand new– I’d be worried if they were anything but.


This chopstick company could use a copy editor

May 1, 2011

While out at the new Scholars Bistro in Boston last night, we noticed this funny language:

Today I saw this funny sign at the Oneida, New York rest stop

January 20, 2011

Everything’s normal until you get to the bottom.

Bruegger’s discussion #985739

December 31, 2010

Yesterday morning I was in Bruegger’s. I couldn’t help but listen to the conversation two girls were having. I call them girls, but they probably were in their early 30s. Their discussion went something like this:

Girl 1: “My company is really into tracking metrics.”

Girl 2: “Oh my gosh, so is mine! What metrics do you track?”

Girl 1: “Well our number one metric is usage. But usage can be soooo hard to track! I mean, just because a customer has one of our tools running on his computer doesn’t mean he’s actually using it!”

Girl 2: “Totally. I totally see what you mean. We haven’t really come across that problem yet, but I hear you.”

Girl 1: “And have I told you yet about my thoughts on developers? I mean, we have to work with them, but it’s soooo difficult. I mean, it’s such a struggle, finding that perfect balance between pushing them to give you information and giving them their space. You don’t want to annoy them too much.”

Girl 2: “Wow, I really agree with that assessment.”

Girl 1: “And it can be so hard to get customer feedback. I try, and nothing happens. Our response rates are so low.”

Girl 2: “Same here!”

Girl 1: “And whenever we release a new product, we only call it the beta version for two months. We used to call it the beta version for longer, but we’d get so many calls from confused customers. They wouldn’t understand what beta meant.”

Girl 2: “Oh, we haven’t run into that problem yet. But we just might one day!”

The conversation continued with the one girl bringing up supposed work issues, and the other girl interjecting supportive statements. I found this dynamic amusing. Plus, I thought it was funny these girls were so loudly and passionately discussing the intricacies of their work lives when everyone else was stuffing bagels into their mouths, reading the newspaper, or conversing quietly.

4th Somerville Jingle Bell Run brings some cheer to my Sunday morning

December 19, 2010

I was sitting in my bedroom when I started hearing lots of stomping and bells ringing. I opened my blinds and saw hordes of red- and green-clad runners headed down Cedar Street. Here are some photos I took through my window screen (yeah, I’m like that old lady who hangs out by her window waiting for something to happen):

Here’s an approximately two-minute video I made:

My favorite knock-knock jokes

November 5, 2010

My absolute favorite:

Person 1: Knock-knock

Person 2: Who’s there?

Person 1: Dishwasher

Person 2: Dishwasher who?

Person 1: Dishwashern’t the way I shpoke before I got falsh teef

Another good one:

Person 1: Knock-knock

Person 2: Who’s there?

Person 1: Dwayne

Person 2: Dwayne who?

Person 1: Dwayne the tub I’m gonna dwown!

Kind of a dumb one, but I like it anyway:

Person 1: Knock-knock

Person 2: Who’s there?

Person 1: Scott

Person 2: Scott who?

Person 1: Scott something up your nose

Yeah, I love knock-knock jokes. Call me a simpleton (I also like state humor). I need to find a few more good ones to add to my repertoire!

A couple of good movies

November 3, 2010

I’ve seen both of these within the last month. One is “Departures,”  a Japanese film. Here’s the DVD cover:

The other is “Get Low,” an independent movie starring Robert Duvall, Bill Murray and Sissy Spacek. Here’s the DVD cover:

It’s funny both pictures have a cerulean blue background. Anyway, I saw the Japanese movie at my friend Ina’s house. She had a bunch of girls over to watch an Academy Award-nominated film in the Foreign Language category. We plan to get together again and watch another movie that falls into this category.

Overall, we enjoyed this film. It’s basically about a man who loses his job as a cellist, and must find a new one. He comes across a job listing in the paper, but it doesn’t exactly state what the job is. He goes to an interview, and finds out he’d be cleaning dead bodies and conducting rituals to lead their spirits into the afterlife.

That doesn’t necessarily sound THAT bad, but you come to discover the job has some pretty negative aspects. Like, he gets calls in the middle of the night to retrieve dead bodies from wherever the person died. One lady had been dead for a week or so when she was discovered, so the body was all gross and decomposing when he arrived.

Another difficult aspect of the job is that society looks down on you. I think it’s because Japanese families used to take care of cleaning the body and doing the ceremonies. I think they view the man’s job as something a “stranger” shouldn’t be doing. The man’s wife certainly didn’t approve of what he was doing until she saw him perform some of the rituals. She was moved by their beauty, and her husband’s care at performing them.

The rituals also made a really positive impact on the families of the deceased. Anyway, here are some reasons I like the movie:

  • The beautiful string music
  • The glimpse into Japanese culture (for instance, I learned about their public baths)
  • The way the man’s job gives him a greater appreciation for life
  • The unusual plot
  • The subtle humor

I saw “Get Low” with my mom at an independent movie theater near Syracuse, NY. It’s the story of a hermit (played by Robert Duvall) who decides to throw his own funeral party. The catch is he wants to have the party while he’s still alive.  He finds a funeral home that is willing to help him out (they are mainly in it for the money).

At first, he tells everyone he wants to have the party so all the attendees can tell a story about him. The problem with that idea, however, is no one really knows him. He has lived in seclusion in the woods for over 40 years. Whenever anyone walks onto his property, he greets them with a gun and a threat. So the only stories people have are rumors or about brief unpleasant encounters.

So eventually he starts telling everyone (he and the funeral home are advertising heavily for the party) that he’s going to reveal a secret at the party. He’s going to tell everyone why he’s shunned society for so many years. This is a big draw for the townspeople, and results in a huge turnout at the party.

I’m not going to tell you what he ends up telling everyone, but it’s pretty amazing. I will say that it’s a bad thing he did during his youth.  To repent for his sin, he lived in solitude for all those years. When he felt he had paid his dues, he decided to confess his transgression to everyone. It’s quite a story of redemption.

Here are a few reasons I liked this movie:

  • The strong performances by Robert Duvall and Bill Murray (he heads the funeral home, and is quite funny)
  • The overarching question of why the man lived in seclusion for so long
  • The suggestions that he used to be happy and in love (and your desire to learn more about this)
  • Some of the cheesy but moving dialogue, like a quote about how leaving things alone (like nature) makes them beautiful…I’m really frustrated I can’t find this particular quote online.
  • The movie’s rural setting
  • The fact the movie is based on a true story

I really liked this movie, but not quite as much as “Departures”. I think part of the reason was because for a while you don’t understand why the man would organize a party to have people tell stories about him. You don’t realize there’s another reason for the party until later on, and are kind of confused in the meantime.

Some funny French expressions

September 21, 2010

Because I don’t currently have much of an opportunity to use my French, I instead subject my boyfriend and various friends to the English versions of my French expressions. They sounds quite ridiculous, but that doesn’t bother me.

Here’s the first expression:

  • “I have the ants.”

When the French have a body party that’s asleep, they say “J’ai les fourmis,” or “I have the ants” in English. It sounds hilarious, but I can see why they’d say this. A body part that’s fallen asleep kind of also feels like it’s been invaded by ants. It’s like there’s a bunch of ants scurrying around inside of your body.

Here’s the next expression I anglicize:

  • “I am a poor pilgrim.”

When a French person is feeling like a loser, either after doing something stupid or befalling a negative circumstance, he or she says “Je suis un pauvre pélérin,” or “I am a poor pilgrim” in English. One time a Frenchman called me a poor pilgrim immediately after I had gotten caught in the pouring rain, broken my umbrella, and dropped my book into a muddy puddle.

I suppose this expression also makes sense. Pilgrims likely faced many obstacles on their way to the holy land, some of which probably made them feel pretty uncomfortable, frustrated, or hopeless. They were poor pilgrims!

The next expression is:

  • “He gave me a rabbit.”

When a man stands a girl up, the girl says “Il m’a posé un lapin,” or “He gave me a rabbit.” This one really doesn’t make sense to us English speakers, and I would reckon most French speakers don’t know the origin of the expression. I found several explanations, but this one made the most sense to me. It says that “rabbit” used to signify “the refusal to pay.” It was, for example, used to explain the act of traveling (say, by train) without paying. The expression was “voyager en lapin,” or “travel like a rabbit.”

I’m not sure why a rabbit reference was used for someone who didn’t pay, and not a reference to a bird, turtle or squirrel. Maybe because rabbits are especially sneaky.  But anyway, I guess the French then started saying “Il l’a posé un lapin,” or “He gave her a rabbit,” when a man didn’t end up paying a prostitute. Basically the man “gave her a refusal of payment.” The expression evolved over time, and now means someone didn’t respect a planned rendezvous.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com/photos/cplapied/1278788003

I love movies about dysfunctional families!

August 10, 2010

I don’t know why– they just make me laugh! Call me sadistic, but that’s how I feel!

I think part of it is because these movies are very real to me. They show the way things are, not some idealized world.

Yesterday I saw a dysfunctional family movie, and I must say it’s the best movie I’ve seen in a long time! I couldn’t stop laughing!

In “The Kids Are All Right” Annette Bening and Julianne Moore play a married lesbian couple who have daughter and a son. Toward the beginning of the movie the son wants to meet his sperm donor (who’s also the daughter’s sperm donor).

The daughter ends up calling him, and the three of them meet up. They sort of hit it off and decide to hang out again. The mothers soon find out about this, and are pretty apprehensive about letting this stranger into their lives. But they agree to meet the donor in order to support their kids.

Anyway, craziness ensues. I won’t give away too much, but basically the entrance of this man into their lives upends the family’s stability. Not that there weren’t issues to begin with. One of the moms is extremely controlling and obsessive, and the other feels like she’s not being supported  by her wife career wise.

The kids are actually pretty normal, but the parents issues blow up. At this point (and actually throughout the movie) you see amazing performances by Bening and Moore. Oh my god, the way Bening looks when she’s mad is remarkable! She has a glacial look that sends chills down your spine.

And Moore’s portrayal of a self-conscious, wordsmith (the way she uses words make her so charming!) is almost as good.

I highly recommend this movie to anyone who likes to laugh and appreciate strangeness!